Love & Marriage in Jane Eyre.

-​ ​For Jane: Jane and Rochester are clearly well suited ​but have to be separated in order to experience a time ​of individual character development before they can ​enjoy peace together. ​-​ ​Jane needs to become Rochester’s equal in ​independence and maturity: her physical struggle and ​emotional torment strengthen her character and turn ​her from a naïve girl into a woman. ​-​ ​Rochester commits a selfless act and proves that he ​has seen the error of his former ways in order to ​become a whole person again. He now needs jane as much as she needs him. ​-​ ​Ironically, he is a better man without his sight and his hand than when he was whole and ​Jane loves him more when he is vulnerable than when he was fiercely independent. ​ ​In the Wider Novel  ​-​ ​Aunt Reed’s refusal to keep the promise made to her dead husband. ​-​ ​The scornful description of cousin Georgiana’s ‘advantageous match’ (Ch. 22). ​-​ ​The prospect of a union between Rochester and Blanch Ingram, clearly advantageous ​financially and socially, but not founded on love. ​-​ ​St John Rivers’ love for Rosamund Oliver which is described as possibly a surface attraction: ​‘while something in me…is acutely sensible to her charms, something else is as deeply ​impressed with her defects’ (Ch. 32). ​-​ ​The prospect of a marriage of duty and convenience between Jane and St. John, passionately ​rejected by Jane: ‘I scorn your idea of love…I scorn the counterfeit sentiment you offer’ (Ch. ​34). ​ ​Key Quotes 

 ​”He is not to them what he is to me,” I thought: “he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—I am ​sure he is,—I feel akin to him,—I understand the language of his countenance and movements: ​though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and ​nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him. […] I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever ​sundered:—and yet, while I breathe and think I must love him.” ​-​ ​Seeing Rochester amongst his high-class houseguests, Jane realises that he has more in ​common with her than he does with them. ​ ​”Whenever I marry,” she continued, after a pause which none interrupted, “I am resolved my ​husband shall not be a rival, but a foil to me. I will suffer no competitor near the throne; I shall exact ​an undivided homage: his devotions shall not be shared between me and the shape he sees in his ​mirror.” ​-​ ​Blanche Ingram’s idea of a good marriage is one in which the partners are distinctly different ​and one partner is far superior to the other. As a stunning beauty, she doesn’t want a ​handsome husband, but a hideous one: that way she’ll always get all the attention. ​ -​ ​For Jane: Jane and Rochester are clearly well suited ​but have to be separated in order to experience a time ​of individual character development before they can ​enjoy peace together. ​-​ ​Jane needs to become Rochester’s equal in ​independence and maturity: her physical struggle and ​emotional torment strengthen her character and turn ​her from a naïve girl into a woman. ​-​ ​Rochester commits a selfless act and proves that he ​has seen the error of his former ways in order to ​become a whole person again. He now needs jane as much as she needs him. ​-​ ​Ironically, he is a better man without his sight and his hand than when he was whole and ​Jane loves him more when he is vulnerable than when he was fiercely independent. ​ ​In the Wider Novel 

 ​-​ ​Aunt Reed’s refusal to keep the promise made to her dead husband. ​-​ ​The scornful description of cousin Georgiana’s ‘advantageous match’ (Ch. 22). ​-​ ​The prospect of a union between Rochester and Blanch Ingram, clearly advantageous ​financially and socially, but not founded on love. ​-​ ​St John Rivers’ love for Rosamund Oliver which is described as possibly a surface attraction: ​‘while something in me…is acutely sensible to her charms, something else is as deeply ​impressed with her defects’ (Ch. 32). ​-​ ​The prospect of a marriage of duty and convenience between Jane and St. John, passionately ​rejected by Jane: ‘I scorn your idea of love…I scorn the counterfeit sentiment you offer’ (Ch. ​34). ​ ​Key Quotes 

 ​”He is not to them what he is to me,” I thought: “he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—I am ​sure he is,—I feel akin to him,—I understand the language of his countenance and movements: ​though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and ​nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him. […] I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever ​sundered:—and yet, while I breathe and think I must love him.” ​-​ ​Seeing Rochester amongst his high-class houseguests, Jane realises that he has more in ​common with her than he does with them. ​ ​”Whenever I marry,” she continued, after a pause which none interrupted, “I am resolved my ​husband shall not be a rival, but a foil to me. I will suffer no competitor near the throne; I shall exact ​an undivided homage: his devotions shall not be shared between me and the shape he sees in his ​mirror.” ​-​ ​Blanche Ingram’s idea of a good marriage is one in which the partners are distinctly different ​and one partner is far superior to the other. As a stunning beauty, she doesn’t want a ​handsome husband, but a hideous one: that way she’ll always get all the attention. ​ -​ ​For Jane: Jane and Rochester are clearly well suited ​but have to be separated in order to experience a time ​of individual character development before they can ​enjoy peace together. ​-​ ​Jane needs to become Rochester’s equal in ​independence and maturity: her physical struggle and ​emotional torment strengthen her character and turn ​her from a naïve girl into a woman. ​-​ ​Rochester commits a selfless act and proves that he ​has seen the error of his former ways in order to ​become a whole person again. He now needs jane as much as she needs him. ​-​ ​Ironically, he is a better man without his sight and his hand than when he was whole and ​Jane loves him more when he is vulnerable than when he was fiercely independent. ​ ​In the Wider Novel 

 ​-​ ​Aunt Reed’s refusal to keep the promise made to her dead husband. ​-​ ​The scornful description of cousin Georgiana’s ‘advantageous match’ (Ch. 22). ​-​ ​The prospect of a union between Rochester and Blanch Ingram, clearly advantageous ​financially and socially, but not founded on love. ​-​ ​St John Rivers’ love for Rosamund Oliver which is described as possibly a surface attraction: ​‘while something in me…is acutely sensible to her charms, something else is as deeply ​impressed with her defects’ (Ch. 32). ​-​ ​The prospect of a marriage of duty and convenience between Jane and St. John, passionately ​rejected by Jane: ‘I scorn your idea of love…I scorn the counterfeit sentiment you offer’ (Ch. ​34). ​ ​Key Quotes 

 ​”He is not to them what he is to me,” I thought: “he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine;—I am ​sure he is,—I feel akin to him,—I understand the language of his countenance and movements: ​though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and ​nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him. […] I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever ​sundered:—and yet, while I breathe and think I must love him.” ​-​ ​Seeing Rochester amongst his high-class houseguests, Jane realises that he has more in ​common with her than he does with them. ​ ​”Whenever I marry,” she continued, after a pause which none interrupted, “I am resolved my ​husband shall not be a rival, but a foil to me. I will suffer no competitor near the throne; I shall exact ​an undivided homage: his devotions shall not be shared between me and the shape he sees in his ​mirror.” ​-​ ​Blanche Ingram’s idea of a good marriage is one in which the partners are distinctly different ​and one partner is far superior to the other. As a stunning beauty, she doesn’t want a ​handsome husband, but a hideous one: that way she’ll always get all the attention. ​ 

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